The people on Grand Designs who ignore their architect

Paul Sanderson Hanicke Robins SandersonBy Paul

 

I’ve been doing some volunteering work, local to where I live. I won’t say what it is, as that wouldn’t be fair.

 

However, there was a huge debate a little while ago within this organisation about how we communicate to the wider public about what we are trying to do.

 

There was recognition that I have the communications experience, and so I put together a strategy.

 

This strategy outlined a face-to-face approach explaining to the public what we do, a digital approach that used a website and social media to enhance that communication, and finally (and with least priority) an approach of using leaflets and the press.

 

But some of the more conservative members of the group put all their thoughts and focus onto producing a leaflet as that is what they have always done.

 

A leaflet is fine in the right circumstances, but in these circumstances, it came at great cost to the organisation (printing etc), and its benefit wasn’t necessarily clear.

 

The problem is that the majority of the group I am working with are set in their ways. They are used to sending out leaflets, and even if it isn’t working, they still feel they should do it.

 

Although there are members of the group who recognised my communications expertise was valuable, those conservative ones were holding back the overall aims of the organisation by not adapting to the reality of now.

 

Adrienne and I have written about the 1980s and the 1990s in our blogs, and we shouldn’t return to those days in terms of communications. We have to build on those days, but also adapt to the realities of 2015.

Kevin McCloud Grand Designs

Working with the volunteering group reminded me a bit of those people you see on Grand Designs who have a vision for their dream house, they employ an architect who draws up the plans and they love the house they are going to get.

 

But as the build progresses, they keep interfering and changing things, even though the architect looks on aghast or even walks away. Mistakes and misfits start to get introduced, and you can tell the building won’t be as good as was originally planned. Windows are slightly misaligned, or awkwardly shaped walls are introduced.

 

By the end, Kevin McCloud will usually say something along the lines of “it is a good¬†house, but architects design great houses”.

 

With communications, if you employ that expertise, you have to know your objective, develop the strategy for communicating it, then implement that strategy keeping in mind the objective.

 

If you want great communications support, you also have to know why you want it and then trust it.

 

Eventually, I developed a strategy to communicate to these conservative volunteers. At the meeting, I reiterated the strategy, explained why we shouldn’t focus too much on the leaflet, but should look at our overall objective…and I eventually got my way.

 

Our communications campaign is already delivering results.